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Taxpayers Must Act Fast to Claim $1.5 Billion in Refunds for Tax Year 2019 Before July 17 Deadline

Taxpayers Must Act Fast to Claim $1.5 Billion in Refunds for Tax Year 2019 Before July 17 Deadline

(update) Last Call to Claim 2019 Tax Refunds Before Upcoming Deadline

July 6, 2023

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued an urgent reminder to approximately 1.5 million Americans who have not yet claimed their tax refunds for 2019.

These individuals are encouraged to take action swiftly as the deadline for filing is nearing, with July 17, 2023, set as the final date.

Time Is Of The Essence

According to the IRS, unclaimed refunds from 2019 have an estimated median value of $893 per taxpayer. IRS Commissioner Danny Werfel emphasized the importance of not missing this opportunity, stating,

“The clock is ticking for those who haven’t claimed their 2019 tax refunds. July 17 marks the last chance for taxpayers to file their 2019 returns and get their refunds. We particularly encourage those who may not have filed because of the pandemic to act quickly.”

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The IRS has announced that around 1.5 million taxpayers have not claimed their refunds for the tax year 2019, worth almost $1.5 billion in total. The IRS has reminded taxpayers that they need to file their tax return before July 17, 2023, to claim their refunds. After that, any unclaimed refund will become the property of the US Treasury.

The average median refund for the tax year 2019 is $893. However, this is only a midpoint estimate, and the actual refund amount can vary depending on an individual’s tax situation. To help taxpayers determine whether they are potentially eligible for a refund, the IRS has provided a state-by-state calculation of the number of taxpayers that may have unclaimed refunds (see the table below).

The pandemic has created an unusual situation where people may have forgotten or overlooked their refunds as the 2019 tax returns came due during the pandemic. To ensure that taxpayers don't miss out on their refunds, the IRS has advised them to start gathering their records and review their tax situation now.

The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is another reason for taxpayers to file their tax return for 2019. Many low- and moderate-income workers may be eligible for the EITC, which is worth as much as $6,557 for 2019. The EITC helps individuals and families whose incomes are below certain thresholds.

Taxpayers seeking a 2019 tax refund are reminded that their refund checks may be held if they have not filed tax returns for 2020 and 2021. In addition, the refund will be applied to any amounts still owed to the IRS or a state tax agency and may be used to offset unpaid child support or past-due federal debts, such as student loans.

Options to Get Your Key Docs

The IRS has provided several options for taxpayers to obtain the information they need to file their tax return for 2019, even though it has been several years since that tax year.

Taxpayers can request copies of key documents, such as Forms W-2, 1098, 1099, or 5498 from their employer, bank, or other payers.

Alternatively, they can use the Get Transcript Online tool on the IRS website to order a free wage and income transcript.

Taxpayers can also file Form 4506-T with the IRS to request a wage and income transcript.

To avoid missing out on their refund, taxpayers are advised to start gathering their records and review their tax situation now, particularly if they think they may be eligible for the EITC.

 

State-by-state estimates of individuals who may be due 2019 income tax refunds
State or District Estimated Number of Individuals Median Potential Refund Total Potential Refunds
Alabama 23,900 $880 $23,694,700
Alaska 6,000 $917 $6,542,300
Arizona 35,400 $824 $33,911,500
Arkansas 12,800 $864 $12,586,100
California 144,700 $856 $141,780,000
Colorado 30,100 $859 $29,514,000
Connecticut 15,400 $934 $16,198,400
Delaware 5,700 $880 $5,754,900
District of Columbia 4,400 $887 $4,550,100
Florida 89,300 $893 $89,530,400
Georgia 48,000 $826 $46,269,000
Hawaii 8,800 $932 $9,197,700
Idaho 7,600 $758 $6,996,000
Illinois 55,800 $916 $57,591,300
Indiana 31,700 $916 $32,115,100
Iowa 15,300 $926 $15,492,600
Kansas 14,600 $913 $14,753,700
Kentucky 18,600 $906 $18,574,200
Louisiana 22,000 $877 $22,274,800
Maine 6,400 $876 $6,197,300
Maryland 31,400 $897 $32,344,500
Massachusetts 35,700 $966 $38,400,900
Michigan 48,500 $888 $48,582,600
Minnesota 23,200 $848 $22,387,800
Mississippi 12,300 $820 $11,836,700
Missouri 31,800 $880 $31,345,700
Montana 5,200 $854 $5,144,900
Nebraska 7,800 $893 $7,745,600
Nevada 15,800 $869 $15,550,300
New Hampshire 6,900 $974 $7,451,800
New Jersey 40,500 $924 $42,035,900
New Mexico 9,600 $867 $9,522,400
New York 81,600 $945 $86,826,200
North Carolina 45,800 $862 $44,426,600
North Dakota 3,700 $958 $3,997,100
Ohio 51,800 $868 $50,234,900
Oklahoma 21,400 $897 $21,770,000
Oregon 23,700 $801 $22,348,900
Pennsylvania 56,000 $924 $57,572,600
Rhode Island 4,300 $924 $4,468,700
South Carolina 18,200 $809 $17,264,100
South Dakota 3,700 $918 $3,746,700
Tennessee 28,100 $873 $27,623,700
Texas 135,300 $924 $142,235,200
Utah 11,700 $845 $11,198,400
Vermont 3,100 $901 $3,036,600
Virginia 42,200 $869 $42,110,500
Washington 42,400 $934 $44,823,200
West Virginia 6,500 $959 $6,818,900
Wisconsin 21,000 $834 $20,003,100
Wyoming 3,300 $949 $3,534,800
Totals 1,469,000 $893 $1,479,913,400
Ines Zemelman, EA
Founder of TFX